We're All Bound To Go
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Lesley Nelson-Burns


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Lyrics
This shanty dates from the Irish emigration of the 1840s and 1850s. It is also known as Heave Away, Me Johnnies. There are many variations to the lyrics. Hugill has two melodies and three sets of lyrics. The lyrics and information here are from Frank Shay's American Sea Songs and Chanteys, the music is from 50 Sailors' Songs or Chanteys.

Mr. Tapscott was William Tapscott, a Liverpool emigrant agent. The Henry Clay was a famous packet of the Swallowtail Line. In 1846 The Henry Clay was wrecked off the New Jersey coast. Several people died, but the ship was salvaged and rebuilt. On September 4, 1849 she burned at her pier. The hulk was then sold to the Collins Dramatic Line and rebuilt. She resumed Liverpool service and at the end of the Civil War was a freight packet.

Frank Shay says this is a capstan shanty, but Stan Hugill gives it as a brake-windlass shanty.

As I was walked down the Landing Stage,
All on a Summer's morn,,
Heave away, my Johnny, Heave Away.
It's there I spied an Irish girl,
A-looking all forlorn.
And away my Johnnie boys,
We're all bound to go.


Oh, good morning, Mr. Tapscott,
Good morning, my girl, says he,
Heave away, my Johnny, Heave Away.
Have you got a packet ship,
To carry me across the sea?
And away my Johnnie boys,
We're all bound to go.


Oh yes, I have a clipper ship,
She's called the Henry Clay,
Heave away, my Johnny, Heave Away.
She sails today for Boston Bay,
She sails away at break of day.
And away my Johnnie boys,
We're all bound to go.


Oh will you take me to Boston Bay,
When she sails away at break of day?
Heave away, my Johnny, Heave Away.
I want to marry a Yankee boy,
And I'll cross the sea no more.
And away my Johnnie boys,
We're all bound to go.



Related Links
From Fifty Sailor's Songs or Chanties,
American Sea Songs and Chanteys and
Shanties from the Seven Seas
See Bibliography for full information.